Monday, June 29, 2009

If you like pina frittata ...

This past week I, uh, can't remember anything that happened because my rowdy 23-year-old cousin came to town and wiped my entire brain clean. The next time she visits, I am going to have to train for it.

I also ran two running events in the course of a week, meaning I ran 18.4 miles in things that resulted in a T'shirt, and 0.0 miles when there wasn't a T'shirt involved. My athleticism clearly requires compensation.

In other news:


BREAKING FOODS
Pesto Potato Frittata: Holy crap did I break this. It turned into green baked eggs with chunks, burn, and regret in it. My most serious error was not using a nonstick skillet. Silly rookie. I didn't stand a chance.

I'm going to try this again, though, because all the flavors -- pesto, red peppers, eggs, onions, potatoes -- tasted good together and the idea seems excellent. The execution was piss poor.

The entire time, the song "If You Like Pina Frittata" was stuck in my melon. Anyway, this blogger posted the recipe. I love when that happens.



Thai Noodles: This one comes from Ruth Riechl's book "Garlic And Sapphires," and it is a simple comfort foodish meal of noodles, scallions, and egg with fish sauce, rice vinegar and sugar, served with red pepper flakes and sriracha sauce to taste. It was nice and mushy, like mashed potatoes or macaroni and cheese. I opted out of adding pork and shrimp in favor of tofu sauteed in peanut oil, which means the food was 100 percent white, decorated with just drops of sriracha.

I can't believe I'm going to say this, but it would probably be better with meat. But the idea of manhandling shrimp for 20 minutes and then futzing around with pork seemed exhausting.

I also learned that I am not capable of using a wok. I ditched out for a regular pan mid-meal.

READING
Garlic and Sapphires: The Secret Life of a Critic in Disguise by Ruth Reichl: In the 1990s, Ruth Reichl was courted by, and eventually became the food critic for the New York Times -- albeit reluctantly. On her first tentative trip to the food capital of the world from her home in Los Angeles, she is recognized by her seatmate. There is seemingly a bounty on the potential critic's head from the NYC restaurateurs who live and die by the NYT's star-system. Not to mention, the boisterous recognizer wants to see what Reichl is going to do with the crappy airplane food that is...more In the 1990s, Ruth Reichl was courted by, and eventually became the food critic for the New York Times -- albeit reluctantly. On her first tentative trip to the food capital of the world from her home in Los Angeles, she is recognized by her seatmate. There is seemingly a bounty on the potential critic's head from the NYC restaurateurs who live and die by the NYT's star-system. Not to mention, the boisterous recognizer wants to see what Reichl is going to do with the crappy airplane food that is set in front of her.

"Garlic and Sapphires: The Life of a Critic in Disguise" is Reichl's story of trying to maintain anonymity in a place where her life story is required reading for restaurant employees.

Full review here.

FREAKIN' SCARY MOVIE WATCHING
Them (a.k.a. Ils) This French horror flick came with commands to watch it now, from Audra of Art To Choke On. She has revealed herself to be a person whose movie advice I can follow. This movie was absolutely terrifying. The premise is similar to "Funny Games," in which a couple in a big house is being terrorized. Much of it is just a person running from an unseen someone, through this house's mazes. My entire body felt like it have been doused in Ben Gay.

Will someone explain to me why foreign horror flicks are so much better than the shit put out here?

Also, this one can be streamed instantly on Netflix. Wee! Best invention ever.

1 comment:

beret said...

Have you and Chuck ever considered opening a bar/restaurant? Your food always looks SO good.